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State of Montana Government:  

                                

MONTANA

Montana Sovereign    

 

CONSTITUTION:

The Montana Constitution defines the powers of the three branches of government and describes the basic rights belonging to the people of the State.

 

1884 Montana Constitution

1889 Montana Constitution

1972 Montana Constitution

 

SCHOOL TRUST LANDS:

Montana School Trust Lands

Did you know Montana owns more than 5.1 million acres of school trust lands that are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) to generate revenue for the support of public schools, parts of the university system, and other endowed institutions?

This land was set aside at the time Montana became a state because of the Enabling Act .

Conservation and protection of the natural resources on these lands are important components of the school trust responsibilities, tied not simply to short-term considerations but to long-term productivity.

In addition to logging, mining, and grazing, the school trust lands are also available for special uses such as: commercial, industrial, and residential development; wildlife habitat; preservation of open space; and development of public facilities.

HERE’S AN IMPORTANT QUESTION THAT ALL MONTANANS, SHOULD BE ASKING,  ESPECIALLY THOSE WHO PAY PROPERTY TAXES:

 

Is it possible that the climate change and environmental movements in Montana have served to limited the use of  these lands to pay for our schools?  Are Montana’s schools, students, and ultimately its citizens being shortchanged?

 

Do your homework.

 

 

STATE LEGISLATURE:

Legislative Map

2004-2014

The 62nd session of the Montana Legislature adjourned, sine die, April 28th, 2011.

The 63rd session of the Montana Legislature will convene Monday, January 7, 2013.

The Montana Senate has 50 members, and the House of Representatives has 100.

The Legislature meets in regular session for 90 working days in every odd-numbered year. It is required to do so by state law and the state Constitution. Each session begins, or convenes, at noon on the first Monday in January, unless that is New Year’s Day. In that case, the session convenes on the following Wednesday.

In addition to its regular sessions, the Legislature also may meet in special session to deal with emergencies. Only the governor or a majority of legislators can call a special session.

 

STATE SOVEREIGNTY:

 


What’s the Big Deal About    State Sovereignty?


www.tenthamendmentcenter.com/

 

The Tenth Amendment was intended to confirm the understanding of the people at the time the Constitution was adopted, that powers not granted to the United States were reserved to the States or to the people. It added nothing to the instrument as originally ratified.’’ – United States v. Sprague, 282 U.S. 716, 733 (1931).

The founding fathers had good reason to pen the Tenth Amendment.

The issue of power – and especially the great potential for a power struggle between the federal and the state governments – was extremely important to the America’s founders. They deeply distrusted government power, and their goal was to prevent the growth of the type of government that the British has exercised over the colonies.

Adoption of the Constitution of 1787 was opposed by a number of well-known patriots including Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and others. They passionately argued that the Constitution would eventually lead to a strong, centralized state power which would destroy the individual liberty of the People. Many in this movement were given the poorly-named tag “Anti-Federalists.”

The Tenth Amendment was added to the Constitution of 1787 largely because of the intellectual influence and personal persistence of the Anti-Federalists and their allies.

It’s quite clear that the Tenth Amendment was written to emphasize the limited nature of the powers delegated to the federal government. In delegating just specific powers to the federal government, the states and the people, with some small exceptions, were free to continue exercising their sovereign powers.

When states and local communities take the lead on policy, the people are that much closer to the policymakers, and policymakers are that much more accountable to the people. Few Americans have spoken with their president; many have spoken with their mayor.

Adherence to the Tenth Amendment is the first step towards ensuring liberty in the United States. Liberty through decentralization.

 

 

State of Montana Other:

 

    Montana Land Ownership             Digital Atlas of Montana

    Montana Pork Report                     Voter Turnout by County

    Highlights County Population        Election Administrators

    Historical Voter Turnout

Montana Agency Listing

Website

State of Montana Elected Officials:

POSITION

INCUMBENT

TERM END

GOVERNOR (4 yr term)

Steve Bullock—D

Website

Email

Phone:  (406) 444-3111

2016

LT GOVERNOR (4 yr term)

John Walsh—D

Website

Phone:  (406) 444-3111

2016

SECY OF STATE (4 yr term)

Linda McCulloch—D

Website

Email

Phone: (406) 444-4195

2016

ATTY GENERAL (4 yr term)

Tim Fox—R

Website

Email

Phone: (406) 444-2026

2016

STATE AUDITOR (4 yr term)

Monica Lindeen—D

Website

Email

Phone:  (406) 444-2040

2016

SUPERVISOR, MONTANA OFFICE OF PUBLIC EDUCATION (4 yr term)

Denise Juneau—D

Website

Email

Phone: (406) 444-3095

2016

MONTANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

How the commission works

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Service Commissioners Serve a 4 year term

DISTRICT 1

Travis Kavulla
(406) 444-6166

Term Ends 2014

DISTRICT 2

Kirk Bushman
(406) 444-6165

Term Ends 2016

DISTRICT 3

Roger Koopman
(406) 444-6168

Term Ends 2016

DISTRICT 4

Bob Lake
(406) 444-6167

Term Ends 2016

DISTRICT 5

Bill Gallagher

Email

Phone (406) 444-6169

Term Ends 2016